EHTPA Statement on Fitness to Practise

Definition

A Herbal or Traditional Medicine practitioner is fit to practise when they have the health and character, as well as the necessary skills and knowledge to do their job safely and effectively. They must also act legally.

Key skills and knowledge required for practising

  1. Be able to carry out a physical examination of a patient;
  2. Be able to prepare, dispense and verify a herbal or traditional medicine prescription;
  3. Communicate effectively with patients and other health professionals;
  4. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the EHTPA Core Curriculum including the relevant tradition specific curriculum.

Health and character

Due to the strict professional standards for a practitioner, it is required that:

  • You do not have any medical condition that could affect your ability to practise safely.
  • You have not been convicted of a criminal offence, received a police caution or been convicted of a criminal offence for which you received a conditional discharge that could affect your ability to practise safely.
  • You have not been disciplined by a professional or regulatory body that could affect your ability to practise safely.
  • You have not had civil proceedings (other than a divorce/dissolution of marriage) brought against you that could affect your ability to practise safely.

When is fitness to practise assessed?

Fitness to Practise may be formally assessed at all or any of these stages:

  1. Admission to an accredited programme;
  2. As a student on an accredited programme;
  3. Registration with a Professional Association;
  4. Following a formal complaint to a Professional Association.

Updated 28th May 2020